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Should You Hire a Pest Exterminator? | Clark Pest Control

 

by Amanda Joyce

More Details about Clark Pest Control San Diego here.

 Rodents and other pests are common problems for San Diego home owners. Discovering a pest control problem is every home owner's worst nightmare. Ridding your home of insects and/or rodents can be very a costly and time consuming process. So what do you do if you are faced with a pest control problem? Contact an Experienced Pest Exterminator!

Why You Should Contact an Experienced Pest Exterminator ?

Cost

Many homeowners attempt to deal with a pest control problem on their own. In most cases the homeowner is attempting to save money by tackling the problem themselves. Unfortunately they often end up spending money on chemicals, rodent traps, etc. and in the end still have to hire a professional.

Safety

Pest control chemicals are very potent and can be hazardous to humans. Therefore you should only trust a trained pest control professional with these chemicals around your home and your family. If you are dealing with a rodent problem, many of them carry diseases and again it is best to depend on a trained professional to handle and dispose of them.

Efficiency

Dealing with a pest infestation of any kind without the proper training and equipment will likely take hours of time. Save yourself the headache and your valuable time, hire an expert.

These are just a few of the many reasons you should hire a trained exterminator to handle your pest control needs. At Clark Pest Control, the nation's largest family-owned pest control company, we serve clients throughout the California and Reno, Nevada. As one of our largest markets, we have been providing San Diego Extermination services for years. If you are in need of San Diego Exterminator, contact us today.

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Reduced trash pick-ups could mean rodent trouble for Flint MI.

 

Reduced Flint trash pick-up begins Monday; residents worry about onset of rodents

By Kristin Longley | Flint Journal

FLINT, Michigan - His formal name is Rattus norvegicus, but here in Flint we know him intimately as the rat.

The greasy, gnawing rodent feeds at night, burrows beneath homes and garages and eats everything no matter how disgusting.

But its delicacy of choice? Fresh household trash.

The preferred diet of the rat - and other pesky vermin - has some residents worried that a city decision to collect trash every other week will cause an explosion of the local rodent population.

Rats are attracted to exposed garbage, which could become a serious health hazard if people store trash near their homes, said Genesee County Health Officer Mark Valacak.

Rats can carry several communicable diseases, can fit through an opening a half of an inch wide and are known to bite, he said.

"Just wait for the mice and things to come," said Flint resident Charlie Luster, 68. "People aren't going to want (trash) in their home, and they'll put it out on the side of the road."

Beginning Monday, residential trash pickup will be reduced to every other week, meaning household waste in most cases will be sitting around for an extra week before crews are able to collect it - and it will be up to residents to make sure it's properly stored.

Garbage needs to be kept in secure, covered containers - preferably ones strong enough to withstand tiny, sharp teeth, said Valacak.

Storing trash properly also will cut down on odors and deterioration of wet garbage, he said.

"I'm personally going to have to buy two more trash cans with secure lids," Flint Mayor Dayne Walling said. "We're going to have to do some new things in new ways."

Walling said the trash cuts will save the city about $20,000 a week and more than $1 million in the first full year. The city is trying to trim a projected $8 million deficit.

News reports show cash-strapped cities across the nation are considering similar cuts or privatization of trash collection to save money.

Still, residents can't help but picture a stinky summer with bags of trash rotting in the sun or fear for an increase in illegal dumping on Flint's hundreds of vacant lots...

Click here to read the entire article

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Reduced trash pick-ups could mean rodent trouble for Flint MI.

 

Reduced Flint trash pick-up begins Monday; residents worry about onset of rodents

By Kristin Longley | Flint Journal

FLINT, Michigan - His formal name is Rattus norvegicus, but here in Flint we know him intimately as the rat.

The greasy, gnawing rodent feeds at night, burrows beneath homes and garages and eats everything no matter how disgusting.

But its delicacy of choice? Fresh household trash.

The preferred diet of the rat - and other pesky vermin - has some residents worried that a city decision to collect trash every other week will cause an explosion of the local rodent population.

Rats are attracted to exposed garbage, which could become a serious health hazard if people store trash near their homes, said Genesee County Health Officer Mark Valacak.

Rats can carry several communicable diseases, can fit through an opening a half of an inch wide and are known to bite, he said.

"Just wait for the mice and things to come," said Flint resident Charlie Luster, 68. "People aren't going to want (trash) in their home, and they'll put it out on the side of the road."

Beginning Monday, residential trash pickup will be reduced to every other week, meaning household waste in most cases will be sitting around for an extra week before crews are able to collect it - and it will be up to residents to make sure it's properly stored.

Garbage needs to be kept in secure, covered containers - preferably ones strong enough to withstand tiny, sharp teeth, said Valacak.

Storing trash properly also will cut down on odors and deterioration of wet garbage, he said.

"I'm personally going to have to buy two more trash cans with secure lids," Flint Mayor Dayne Walling said. "We're going to have to do some new things in new ways."

Walling said the trash cuts will save the city about $20,000 a week and more than $1 million in the first full year. The city is trying to trim a projected $8 million deficit.

News reports show cash-strapped cities across the nation are considering similar cuts or privatization of trash collection to save money.

Still, residents can't help but picture a stinky summer with bags of trash rotting in the sun or fear for an increase in illegal dumping on Flint's hundreds of vacant lots...

Click here to read the entire article

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Vegetation Management - Will Harrison

 

 

Up on the stage is Will Harrison who will be talking to us about weed control and weed control programs.

Why do we need a weed control program?

First and formost if you have a processing facility or even a home weeds attract rodents and insects. Rodents eventually make their inside.

Weeds create fire hazzards

Displays an unprofessional look regardless what type of buisness it is.

Weed control needs to be an integrated approach, more than just herbicides.

Can Weed Control be cost effective?

Can Weed control be done in a cost efficient manner?

Four basic ideas

Observe

  1. know your enemy
  2. know the density
  3. what is creating the problem
  4. sensitive site 

 

Plan

  1. Herbicide selection
  2. Sensitive location (hospital or school close by)
  3. Timing of application 

  

 Execute

 

Evaluate 

 

  1. What did I miss?
  2. Why did I not Kill the weeds?

 

Will is also covering weed types including the tumble weed (common to Russia) which is also known as Russian Thistle.

Did You know... the "Tree of Heaven" is not actually a Tree, but a weed and can grow up to 60 feet tall! 

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Rodent Control - Schools call in the exterminators for vermin 625 times

 

Published Date: 26 February 2010
By VICTORIA RAIMES PEST

Exterminators have been called out to schools in Edinburgh 625 times in the past year to deal with infestations including mice, ants and even squirrels.
Statistics reveal that the old Tynecastle High School was the most troublesome for pests - visited 44 times due to problems with ants, mice, wasps, rats and fleas.

Other badly affected schools include Dalry Primary School, which was forced to call out exterminators 13 times to get rid of mice, Holyrood High School, which called for help with ants 14 times, and Gracemount Primary, which had a recurring problem with squirrels.

Other problems listed included issues with wasps, pigeons, fleas, gulls, snails and cockroaches.

One Edinburgh company estimated that it would cost the city council £50 per call-out, bringing the total amount of money dedicated to ridding schools of vermin to approximately £31,250.

A city council spokesman said: "Hygiene standards in our schools are very high and where emerging problems are found we take swift action to have them removed before they get established."

Hermitage Park Primary School has suffered from a pigeon problem, forcing them to call pest control out three times. Granton Primary School has seen an issue with seagulls and fleas, and Prestonfield Primary School had to get rid of snails.

 

Click here to read the entire article

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Dirty Dining: Restaurants that are cleaning up their act

 

by Jason Lamb
ktuu.com

ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- While most restaurant owners in Anchorage do a fine job running their establishments, city reports show a few in town have fallen short when it comes to the health and safety of the food you eat.

From filthy food surfaces to rodent droppings all over the kitchen, the horror stories can be pretty disgusting.

For a break during lunch you might try the Sushi Ya Japanese restaurant on Dimond.

Its easily-accessible location attracts dozens of diners every day.

But the city's health inspections database shows the restaurant received several critical violations back in September.

Reports show during its last inspection, a food worker would "briefly run hands under water and shake off excess water" as a means of washing their hands.

So we decided to check in on how they're doing now.

Chong Kim, a Sushi Ya employee showed Channel 2 the walk-in cooler.

"It's like the chicken and the vegetable is all the stuff in here. It's the cooler, walk-in cooler," Kim said.

Back in September Sushi Ya was busted because "raw chicken was found stored above cooked chicken" in the cooler. That's a big problem, says the city health expert.

"The cooked chicken is ready to eat, you can take it out to the customers and serve it that way. Obviously if you have chicken blood that could drip on the ready-to-eat food below, that's a huge problem," said Chris Tofteberg with the Department of Health and Human Services.

Today the restaurant says it's changed its ways.

"We always keep in the bottom the raw, and the vegetables and the cooked stuff in the top," Kim said.

Another problem health inspectors found in September: The cleaning solution meant to disinfect and kill germs wasn't powerful at all. In fact, records show there was no sanitizing solution in what they were using to clean up.

Again, Sushi Ya says that doesn't happen anymore.

"We didn't put enough bleach in there, so we added a little bit more, since then," Kim said.

The next stop on our dirty dining tour takes us to Peking Wok on Dimond.

In January health inspectors found even dirtier problems here.

During the inspection the city noticed the manager of the restaurant "put his bare hands on pre cooked sweet and sour pork."

And what's more, according to the reports, "no hand sink is present on the cook line" to wash those bare hands-- a critical violation according to the city.

"What that really indicates to us, is that the handwash sink is not being used. That indicates a whole series of problems that none of the staff are using the handwash sink, because it's not available," Tofteberg said.

Inspectors discovered several other things during their visit in January. From their report, "frozen liquid waste was...on the ground out back." "cabinets, drawers, shelves, tables etc... are filthy."...

Click here to read the entire article

 

Commercial Pest Control

Whether it's controlling cockroaches, ants, beetles, rodents or flying insects, our pest elimination program is customized to target infestations unique to your business. In fact, since little or no preparation is needed by your staff, our pest management program can save you time and money.

Clark Pest Control's licensed, experienced technicians will thoroughly survey your facility to locate any trouble spots. We will determine the need for trapping and monitoring devices, and identify what types of control are necessary. We also provide a comprehensive, written estimate listing all detected problems and the recommended treatment.

Our highly skilled technicians begin the program by immediately ridding your business of pests. They will work with your maintenance and or facilities staff to incorporate mechanical exclusion techniques such as sealing cracks and crevices, caulking around pipes and fixtures, and closing openings in wall voids. In addition to baiting and trapping, we'll treat only where you need it. We will continue to reinforce your pest barrier, keeping newly emerging pests away by applying special treatments throughout the year. Clark Pest Control will work with you to achieve positive long-term results.

Your pest control program includes a quality control report showing what was done, what materials were used, and what you can do to help us maintain control over the pests at your facility. To find out more...

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Rat Panic in Verdi Square

 

 

02082010poison.jpg

The rat problem in the Upper West Side's Verdi Square, once called Needle Park, has gotten so bad that recently the Parks Dept. called for back-up. "We have sent an extra staff person there in the early morning and later in the day," said Cristina DeLuca, a spokeswoman from the Parks Dept. "The park is now being cleaned as much as three times a day to address the rodent issues." Still, neighborhood residents say the rats are part of their routine. "If you clap your hands at night they all jump out of the bushes," said Rob Hafferman, who lives nearby. It turns out, the rodents have not gone undocumented.

In 1987 Verdi Square, then popularly called Needle Park, was a hang-out for drug dealers (1971's "The Panic in Needle Park" stars a young Al Pacino as a scag-hustling junkie) and homeless people. Also rats. That year the Times wrote "scattered pigeon food, such as bread crumbs and corn, has also attracted rats, and notices of rat poison placed by the Parks Department are posted on the square's trees."

Click here to read the entire article

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

DIY DONT! - Resident warns neighbours about deadly pest control measures

 

A puppy in the Cardinal Creek area is lucky to be alive after nibbling on some rat poison left near a public east-end trail. Springridge resident Monica Belanger was walking her six-month-old lab, Daytona, on leash along the trail behind Caprihani Way when the puppy picked something up from the ground.

"She's a puppy so she eats everything," Belanger said. "If I see what's in her mouth I grab it out. Usually it's only a stick."

But this time Daytona chomped down on something that isn't normally found along the trail.

"When I grabbed it out I saw right away it was... Warfarin," Belanger recounted, adding she then saw blue pellets scattered along the edge of the pathway next to a residential garden gate.

Daytona had apparently eaten rat poison. "I had her at the vet's within 20 minutes," Belanger said.

The veterinarian knew right away what they were dealing with because they had the wrapper. Belanger said they induced vomiting and Daytona threw up some pellet pieces, meaning she'd definitely ingested the poison.

The young lab stayed at the vet for three hours under observation and, once her stomach settled, she was given charcoal to soak up any remaining poison, Belanger indicated...

Click here to read the entire article

Note:
I read this and it brings up the question why was this outside on a trail? how did it get there? The first thing that comes to mind is someone was trying to do a little DIY pest control. DIY pest control is dangerous on all fronts, especially when it involves any type of chemical or poison.

Leave pest control to the professionals, Clark Pest Control handles rodent control, give us a call, we do free pest evaluations.

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Rodents - Calls over rodent problems 'drop' during cold

 

As Northern Ireland emerges from its sub-zero temperatures, two populations appear not to have fared so well in the big freeze.

An apparent absence of house mice and rats has had a knock-on effect at Belfast City Council.

The council's pest control department has said there has been a decrease in calls over mice and rat problems during December.

Rat The council says calls over rat problems were down in December

The Council's Pest Control Manager, Earl d'Hulst, said both populations may have been hit by a combination of the severe cold and lack of food in some of their habitats including sheds and garages.

The council provides a pest control service to both domestic and commercial rate payers. The council area takes in about 160,000 domestic properties.

Click here to read the entire article

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Rats - 42 tons of poison to purge island of rats

 

Desperate measure to save Lord Howe Island's native species
By Kathy Marks in Sydney

Lord Howe, an idyllic island off the Australian mainland, carefully conserves its natural treasures. The World Heritage-listed chunk of rock has strict quarantine laws, and limits the number of tourists who may visit. But its unique birds, insects and plants are under threat from an implacable foe: the black rat. Accidentally introduced in 1918 when a ship ran aground, rats are blamed for the extinction of five endemic bird species.

Wildlife experts warn that 13 other native birds, two reptiles, five plants and numerous invertebrates are at risk. Rats are also a threat to the vital tourism industry, which relies on the island's pristine image.

Now Lord Howe, 500 miles north-east of Sydney, has decided to rid itself of rats and mice - and has put together one of the most radical pest-eradication programmes ever attempted. If the plan is approved, the island will be blitzed with poison from the air.

In order to protect local wildlife, entire populations of native birds will be caught and kept in cages for 100 days for their own protection. All cows and chickens will be slaughtered or shipped to the mainland beforehand, while dog owners will be offered muzzles for their pets, and parents will be advised to keep a close eye on their children.

Click here to read the article
 

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.
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