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On Deck - Dr. Jerome Goddard

 

Topics we are discussing right now

1. How/why are pests and vector - born diseases important

2. Primary pest-related health issues 

3. Major dieases in pests: 

  • Mosquitos 
  • Anopheles Mosquitos - Malaria
  • Health effects in mosquitos

Mosquito diseases:

  • Malaria
  • Yellow fever - Most lethal, the American Plague in 1878
  • West Nile
  • Rift valley fever
  • Chikungunya - Africa south east asia - recently found in Italy in 2007
  • Dengue fever(break bone fever) recent out breaks in Florida

Public health Intervention
Mosquito bed netting
repellents 

 

Tick diseases

  • Bacteria
  • Protozoa
  • Virsus
  • Lyme Disease
  • Lyme Borreliosis
  • Rocky mountain spotted fever - possible death after 3 days

Flea Diseases

  • Plague(s)
  • Murine typhus

Fly Disease

  • Myiasis (Blow fly)

Kissing Bug Disease 

  • Chagas
  • Allergic reactions

Rats/Rodents

  • Allergies
  • Asthma 

Bed Bugs 

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

They're heeeere: Year’s first mosquito hatchoff to begin Friday night

 

by Ian White / The Daily News
khou.com
Posted on May 21, 2010 at 9:13 AM

mosquito

GALVESTON, Texas -- Get ready for mosquito season - the little critters are about to descend on the unwary living near the county's beaches and southern bayside areas.

Nurtured by high tides at the beginning of the month that were reinforced by last Friday's heavy rains, the insects' larvae are about to hatch for the first serious swarm of salt marsh mosquitoes this year.

Fortunately for humans, salt marsh mosquitoes do not carry the West Nile virus or St. Louis encephalitis, but their bloodsucking still can be a major source of discomfort.

John Marshall, director of the county's mosquito control district, expects the hatchoff to begin as early as this evening and continue throughout the weekend on Bolivar Peninsula, Galveston's West End, southwest Hitchcock and, to a lesser extent, the eastern fringe of Texas City.

He expects inland areas to be spared because the heavy rain dried out quickly except in the areas alongside the county's beaches and coastal marshlands.

"We will wait until (today) to decide when to start spraying," he said.

"We will be sending our trucks to each affected area about twice during the next week, and our new plane will make as many flights as needed to control the areas the trucks can't reach."

Control district officials will wait until the hatchoff is about 50 percent complete before sending up their turboprop plane because it uses $4,700 worth of insecticide per hour, far more than it costs to fly the plane.

The insecticide is a 40-micron mist the consistency of hair spray. To be effective, it must touch the insects, so the district sprays during the light-wind hours of early evening and morning, when the mosquitoes are active.

"We don't go out when they're resting in long grass during the day," Marshall said, "because the insecticide won't reach them."

Click here to read the entire article

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Pest control programs hit hard by budgetary cuts

 

By Alanna Adamko, The StarPhoenix

Balmy summer-like days are here but the skies may soon be blackened with extra mosquitos.

In the provincial budget handed down March 24, about $1 million was cut from the province's West Nile virus program.

The West Nile program provided funding for municipalities to monitor and control mosquito populations as well as trap and test mosquitoes for the West Nile virus.

The pest management department in Saskatoon received $270,000 last season from the West Nile program to help supplement its staffing costs. Without the funding, pest management was only able to rehire 11 of the 23 staff it had last year. The rest of the staff was reallocated to different departments.

Geoff Mcleod, Saskatoon's pest management supervisor, said the funding cut reduces the number of areas staff can spray with biological larvacide to control the mosquitoe population.

"By having fewer staff dedicated to mosquito control activities, it will reduce our ability to hit all of the water bodies that mosquitos develop in, which then can lead to an increase in adult mosquitoes," he said.

Health Minister Don McMorris told reporters Wednesday the province will still spend $310,000 on West Nile surveillance. A further $60,000 will be used to treat any "hotspots" that may be identified.

"We figured let's keep the surveillance up, and if we see pockets of the mosquito that carries West Nile, we'll have money to put into that area," McMorris said.

He noted there was only one confirmed human case of West Nile last summer and less than 20 cases the year before.

Mcleod said it is too soon to tell whether Saskatoon and the province will experience increased mosquito populations and more West Nile virus cases as a result of funding cuts.

The mosquito population depends largely on weather: A rainy season will create more water bodies for breeding and a dry season will limit the water bodies available.

The West Nile virus is also only found in certain species of mosquitoes. The Culex tarsalis species of mosquitoe has been the principal carrier of the West Nile virus in Saskatchewan. Until tracking and testing results for the Culex tarsalis comes out later in the season, the extent of the West Nile virus in Saskatchewan won't be known.

City of Saskatoon pest management staff also deal with ground squirrel (gopher) control, wasps, Dutch elm disease management and other inspections for insect disease on urban forest and wildlife. With reduced staff, this affects all the pest management programming in Saskatoon.

Adding to the blow is provincial funding cuts to the Dutch elm disease cost-sharing program between the province and municipalities.

The funding, dependent on a municipality's size and number of trees, resulted in Saskatoon and Regina each losing $22,500 in funding they had previously relied on for the monitoring of and removal of diseased trees.

With money provincially only allocated to surveillance and no longer to the removal of diseased trees, Mcleod is worried the disease will spread.

"It's going to be increasingly difficult for them to do rapid removals on tight budgets. That is going to have an impact on the province as a whole," he said.



Read more: http://www.thestarphoenix.com/health/Pest+control+programs+hard+budget/3049943/story.html#ixzz0oam8sMS6

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Pest control programs hit hard by budget cut

 

By Alanna Adamko, The StarPhoenix

Balmy summer-like days are here but the skies may soon be blackened with extra mosquitos.

In the provincial budget handed down March 24, about $1 million was cut from the province's West Nile virus program.

The West Nile program provided funding for municipalities to monitor and control mosquito populations as well as trap and test mosquitoes for the West Nile virus.

The pest management department in Saskatoon received $270,000 last season from the West Nile program to help supplement its staffing costs. Without the funding, pest management was only able to rehire 11 of the 23 staff it had last year. The rest of the staff was reallocated to different departments.

Geoff Mcleod, Saskatoon's pest management supervisor, said the funding cut reduces the number of areas staff can spray with biological larvacide to control the mosquitoe population.

"By having fewer staff dedicated to mosquito control activities, it will reduce our ability to hit all of the water bodies that mosquitos develop in, which then can lead to an increase in adult mosquitoes," he said.

Health Minister Don McMorris told reporters Wednesday the province will still spend $310,000 on West Nile surveillance. A further $60,000 will be used to treat any "hotspots" that may be identified.

"We figured let's keep the surveillance up, and if we see pockets of the mosquito that carries West Nile, we'll have money to put into that area," McMorris said.

He noted there was only one confirmed human case of West Nile last summer and less than 20 cases the year before.

Mcleod said it is too soon to tell whether Saskatoon and the province will experience increased mosquito populations and more West Nile virus cases as a result of funding cuts.

The mosquito population depends largely on weather: A rainy season will create more water bodies for breeding and a dry season will limit the water bodies available.

The West Nile virus is also only found in certain species of mosquitoes. The Culex tarsalis species of mosquitoe has been the principal carrier of the West Nile virus in Saskatchewan. Until tracking and testing results for the Culex tarsalis comes out later in the season, the extent of the West Nile virus in Saskatchewan won't be known.

City of Saskatoon pest management staff also deal with ground squirrel (gopher) control, wasps, Dutch elm disease management and other inspections for insect disease on urban forest and wildlife. With reduced staff, this affects all the pest management programming in Saskatoon.

Adding to the blow is provincial funding cuts to the Dutch elm disease cost-sharing program between the province and municipalities.

The funding, dependent on a municipality's size and number of trees, resulted in Saskatoon and Regina each losing $22,500 in funding they had previously relied on for the monitoring of and removal of diseased trees.

With money provincially only allocated to surveillance and no longer to the removal of diseased trees, Mcleod is worried the disease will spread.

"It's going to be increasingly difficult for them to do rapid removals on tight budgets. That is going to have an impact on the province as a whole," he said.



Read more: http://www.thestarphoenix.com/health/Pest+control+programs+hard+budget/3049943/story.html#ixzz0oam8sMS6

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

UC researcher develops masking agents to keep mosquitoes and insects at bay

 
Monday, February 8th, 2010.
Issue 06, Volume 14.

RIVERSIDE - A process developed by a UC Riverside researcher to keep mosquitoes and other insects at bay might be turned into a commercial product, university officials said today.

OlFactory Laboratories Inc., a Riverside-based nanotechnology firm, signed an agreement with UCR for exclusive rights to utilize the insect repellent technology conceived by Anandasankar Ray, assistant professor in the university's Department of Entomology.

According to UCR, Ray discovered a means to prevent insects from detecting carbon dioxide, which is emitted by animals and humans during breathing. Mosquitoes, black flies and other winged insects can smell the emissions and hone in on their prey that way.

Click here to read the entire article

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

How will cold affect insect pests, weeds?

 
By Dr. William Johnson
Contributor

Published January 20, 2010

Q: Will the recent cold temperatures down into the low 20s and upper teens reduce the number of insect pests in the following summer?

A: I get several inquires from homeowners and gardeners this time of year about whether the cold spells during the winter season will reduce the number of insect pests in the landscape or home.

However, such hope generally is unwarranted as insects are a very resilient form of animal life and are well-adapted to deal with weather-related challenges. They have developed survival strategies that usually guarantee their return each spring.

Some insects go through the winter season as adults, such as leaf-footed bugs, a most dreaded insect pest on tomatoes, citrus and pecans.

Leaf-footed bugs overwinter as adults in aggregations that can be found in trees like palms, citrus, or junipers, or can be found in places like brush piles. They do not feed during the winter, and hunker down together in groups to wait for spring.

Many insects will spend winter in other stages of life (such as eggs, larva, or pupa) which can be even more tolerant of cold temperatures.

Some insects, such as mosquitoes, reproduce so rapidly it would be difficult to tell if a cold winter had any effect on them at all. It goes without saying that Alaska and mosquitoes go hand-in-hand.

Click here to read the entire article 

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Pest Control California - Foreclosure Crisis Brings Unwelcome Pests

 

New America Media, News Report, Annette Fuentes, Posted: Dec 14, 2009

As the foreclosure crisis continues to infect Bay Area residential neighborhoods, county governments are facing one ripple effect. Rats and mosquitos are moving in as homeowners move out.

The latest figures from RealtyTrac, a housing data company, offer more grim news about the housing crisis for the region. In November, there was a 56 percent increase in foreclosure notices sent out to homeowners compared to last year, and more than 6,000 homes are in one stage of the three-part foreclosure process. That means more abandoned houses and neglected properties, which invite a host of unwanted visitors, according to county officials.

Swimming pools, which once offered warm-weather family fun, now are a public health hazard as breeding grounds for mosquitos, carriers of the West Nile virus.

"We have one of the higher foreclosure rates in the state or the nation here in San Joaquin," said Aaron Devencenzi, of the San Joaquin Mosquito & Vector Control District. "At any one time, we're watching from 100 to 2,000 neglected swimming pools on neglected properties."

Devencenzi said his office has had to spend more of its budget to hire extra seasonal workers to monitor the pools at foreclosed properties. When they get calls from neighbors complaining about abandoned pools, workers arrive to introduce mosquito fish, which eat the larvae and prevent a population explosion. "We explain that the pool will still look nasty," he said. "It isn't going to look clean and blue."

Getting access to foreclosed houses can be difficult, so Devencenzi has been doing outreach to realtor associations, asking them to call the district if the properties they're selling have pools that need attention. "Most of this is in urban areas and can be hard to find, so we put ads in the paper and let people know they can call us," he said.

Click here to read the entire article

 

Note:
If you are looking to rid a forclosure of Rodents and Cockroaches, call Clark today for your Residential Rodent Control. Clark offers same day service and available 6 days a week!

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Targeting mosquito larvae before they become adults

 

Pest abatement district completes first year of work

By Nate Poppino - Times-News writer

Twin Falls County's brand-new pest abatement district aggressivelymosquito assaulted black flies and mosquitoes this year and is taking steps to do an even better job next year, representatives told county commissioners on Friday morning.

The visit, during which the district delivered its annual report, gave the commissioners a chance to ask questions about the abatement work they launched themselves with an emergency district two years ago.

Voters in 2008 approved the creation of a formal, better-financed district, complete with an annual budget of $442,000 and a public board of directors. For now, it focuses mainly on just the two insects: Mosquitoes can carry disease and pester humans, breeding in standing water, while black flies prefer moving water and are mainly a threat to livestock operations.

Click here to read the entire article

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Drinking blood makes vampire spider sexier

 

Category: Animal behaviour Animals Invertebrates Predators and prey Sex and reproduction Spiders

Posted on: October 27, 2009 8:30 AM, by Ed Yong
Source: http://scienceblogs.com

Even though its habitat is full of non-biting midges called "lake flies", it can tell the difference between these insects and the blood-carrying mozzies it carries. Robert Jackson from the University of Canterbury discovered this behaviour a few years ago and one of his colleagues, Fiona Cross, has now found that the blood isn't just a meal for the spiders, it's an aphrodisiac too.

Evarcha.jpg
Photo of E.culicivora eating a mosquito, by R. Jackson.

Cross made spiders choose between two adults of the opposite sex, by wafting their smells down a tube on different days and seeing which drew the choosy spider's attention for the longest time. The contenders had been fed on one of four diets: blood-fed female mosquitoes, sugar-fed female mosquitoes, male mosquitoes, or lake flies. 

Click here to read the entire article 

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