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Storing firewood outside helps prevent problems with insects

 

Canton Daily Ledger
Posted Feb 06, 2010 @ 05:12 AM

LEWISTOWN -

A variety of insects live in the dead and dying trees that we use for firewood. "To avoid problems in the house with these insects, store firewood outside," says David Robson, University of Illinois Extension horticulture educator.

Dying trees attract a variety of insects, primarily woodborers, which lay their eggs on the tree. The resulting borer larvae burrow throughout the wood, allowing other organisms to enter the tree, and eventually break it down into nutrients that living plants use.
Since firewood is dead wood, these same borers are common in it. Their eating of the wood does not appreciably reduce the amount of burnable wood over the few months that we store it. When we bring the firewood indoors, the adult borers in the wood warm up, become active, leave the firewood and fly around the house.

Probably the most common borer associated with firewood is the redheaded ash borer. The adult beetle is about 5/8 inch long, reddish-brown and long-legged. It also has four yellowish bands across the back. Since it feeds on wood with fairly high moisture content, it will not attack the dried wood used in house construction.

Worker carpenter ants are large (at least 1/4 inch long), black and wingless. Carpenter ants do not eat wood, but hollow it out for their nests. Pieces of firewood containing nests that are stored indoors provide a base of operations from which the workers forage for crumbs of food all over the house.

Click here to read the entire article.

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Storing firewood outside helps prevent problems with insects

 

Canton Daily Ledger
Posted Feb 06, 2010 @ 05:12 AM

LEWISTOWN -

A variety of insects live in the dead and dying trees that we use for firewood. "To avoid problems in the house with these insects, store firewood outside," says David Robson, University of Illinois Extension horticulture educator.

Dying trees attract a variety of insects, primarily woodborers, which lay their eggs on the tree. The resulting borer larvae burrow throughout the wood, allowing other organisms to enter the tree, and eventually break it down into nutrients that living plants use.
Since firewood is dead wood, these same borers are common in it. Their eating of the wood does not appreciably reduce the amount of burnable wood over the few months that we store it. When we bring the firewood indoors, the adult borers in the wood warm up, become active, leave the firewood and fly around the house.

Probably the most common borer associated with firewood is the redheaded ash borer. The adult beetle is about 5/8 inch long, reddish-brown and long-legged. It also has four yellowish bands across the back. Since it feeds on wood with fairly high moisture content, it will not attack the dried wood used in house construction.

Worker carpenter ants are large (at least 1/4 inch long), black and wingless. Carpenter ants do not eat wood, but hollow it out for their nests. Pieces of firewood containing nests that are stored indoors provide a base of operations from which the workers forage for crumbs of food all over the house.

Click here to read the entire article

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Bugs invade Wilmington school

 

Source: WWAY 3 News
Submitted by Tim Buckley 

Bugs abounded at Blair Elementary in Wilmington this afternoon. Some six-legged friends came to visit more than 100 second graders courtesy of the North Carolina Pest Management Association.

The students were able to watch and touch Madagascar hissing cockroaches and some insect larvae much to most of the students' delight. The visit comes as the students are learning about insects and their life cycle.

"They love it," said the NC Pest Management Association's Lee Smith. "They're able to see the legs. They're able to see the head, the thorax and the abdomen and the antenna, so they get that education."

Said student Jake Splendorio, "I've learned about the cockroaches that they have skeletons, that the bugs have skeletons on the outside of them. This was really really cool."

Of course some students opted to shy away from touching the creepy crawly creatures, but enjoyed watching them from a distance.

Note:
I feel that more industry professionals should do this, there is a diffrence between "GOOD" bugs and "Bad" bugs.

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Pest Control - Don't bring in bugs in with your firewood!

 

J. B. Anders Jr.
LSU AgCenter

When Louisiana temperatures take a dip, many people start thinking about building a roaring fire in their fireplaces. What they don't dream of, however, are the insects that too often come inside with the firewood.

Such insect problems are widespread. But one way to cut down on the bugs that might invade your home with the firewood is to avoid bringing wood inside until you're ready to burn it. Insects which have used the wood as a food or resting place will emerge indoors and worry many people. Insects such as long-horned beetles, buprestids, wasps, some moths and several other small arthropods will fly around indoors and are attracted to lights and windows.

Most insects can be vacuumed up and released outdoors. Wasps generally are the only ones that will sting or cause any harm. Even a dead wasp can inflict a sting at times until the body dries.

Firewood isn't the only source of problems with wasps during the winter. Many people have a problem with wasps during the cool months. The queen wasps will try to hibernate in the walls and attics of houses and, with the heating units running, the wasps may sometimes feel enough warmth to become active.

Then they will come out of light fixtures and wall outlets and can be very serious in homes, dorms and other buildings.

Click here to read the entire article

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Not All Bugs Are Bad!

 

Summer may be when crops thrive, but so do insects. Vanessa Phillips reports on some bugs to look out for this summer.

They can lead gardeners to despair and ruin crops seemingly overnight, but not all bugs are bad. In the home garden there's a whole functional ecosystem, says Nelson entomologist Richard Toft.

Some insects are predators or parasites, he says, while others have dual roles - such as the Asian paper wasp, which are useful to have around if you're growing cabbages because their favourite food is the larvae of the nuisance white butterflies, but on the downside they also like monarch caterpillars.

Some bugs help break down compost, while others are helpful pollinators.

Mr Toft says that when it comes to pest control, gardeners need to use a bit of common sense, because the use of toxic insecticides can also harm helpful insects.

"It becomes a personal choice issue," Mr Toft says.

"Once you go down that chemical treatment route you are often committed to it because you are reducing the numbers of predators as well."

He explains that in many cases the damage done to crops by insects is related to appearance, or "the yuck factor", and the produce may still be edible.

With the varroa bee mite meaning there's less bees around to pollinate crops, people should also put in plants that will encourage pollinators and predators into the garden, he says. Hoverflies, for example, are attracted by flowers such as alyssum, and will help pollinate crops, but their larvae are also predators of aphids and scale, Mr Toft says.

Click here to read the entire article

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Whats in your Christmas Tree?

 

We are FINALLY in December and like most I LOVE the holiday season, the smell of fresh baked cookies, the holiday decorations and of course a nice freshly cut tree. I remember a few years back I unbagged my tree from the lot, placed it in the stand and then noticing someting crawling up my arm....a spider!

This was not the first time, I have had ants, beetles and even a few slugs in my trees. So your probably thinking "If they were cut months before why are they still there?", at least thats what I used to ask myself. I have come to the conclusion that sure, some may be there from before they were cut such as the beetles and maybe...just maybe even the spider, but slugs and Ants?

Remember these tree's have been sitting in containers for a while, then unloaded onto a christmas tree lot, where they lay in piles on the ground or leaned against a fence allowing bugs of all sorts to climb in and make your tree their home. Before you take your tree into your home, I highly recomend unwrapping it and giving it a really good shake, afterwards inspect all the limbs making sure that your keeping the bugs where they belong...OUTSIDE!

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Fickle weather sends pests out of control

 

By Anna Archibald
Thursday, November 5, 2009

Fifteen pairs of black and white striped legs scuttle away as the bed sheets fling up into the air and hit the ceiling. Waking up to a house centipede staring down at you can be alarming.

GSP resident Jenna Schwartz said the building been having a problem with centipedes for the last couple weeks.

"One girl found one on her ceiling when she woke up one morning, and we've also been finding them on our clothes," Schwartz, Eden Prairie, Minn. freshman. said.

Deb Smith, associate professor in the department of ecology and evolutionary biology, said that when the weather fluctuates between warm and cold temperatures, as it has in the past few weeks, temperatures aren't cold enough to kill the bugs but are still cool enough for them to look for warmth in residences.

Smith said if the cold weather was more continuous, insects wouldn't be as active. "There have been too many episodes of warming and cooling to keep them away," she said.

Consequently, students often end up with an unwanted, multi-legged roommate.

Although house centipedes are predatory, which means they hunt other insects, Smith said they don't pose a threat to people.

"When you see them around, it usually means there are or there used to be other insects around, as well," she said.

The house centipede is just one of many types of insects creeping and crawling through dark corners of houses this time of year.

Smith said the most common pests are box elder beetles, mouse spiders, grass spiders and the Asian lady beetle, which is usually mistaken for a common ladybug.

"These beetles were originally brought here to control the population of other types of insects, but have now become more of a nuisance themselves," Smith said. "And honey bees generally come out on these warmish days to eat and dump waste, so they're around more, meaning people are more likely to come into contact with them."

Schwartz said there were always five to 10 of the ladybug-like beetles by her windows in her room.

"They've been getting a lot worse," she said. "It's kind of confusing, though, because my window is closed and I don't know how they are getting in."

Click here to read the entire story

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Daily Pest Profile - Carpenter Ant

 
Physical Characteristics
Carpenter worker ants are 1/8" - 1/2" long and Queens are 1/2" - 5/8" long, black in color. Carpenter Ant - Call Clark Pest Control

Behavior
Carpenter ants are found in large colonies with several queens. Carpenter ant colony nests are usually found in wall voids, insulation, rotting fence posts, decaying trees and can be very destructive to trees and will forage up to 300 feet from the colony nest. Carpenter ants are attracted sqeets such as; honey dew, fruit,plant juices,eggs, meat and other insects.

Treatment
Most infestations of Carpenter ants can be controlled with Clark's Year Round Pest Control. However, in cases of heavy, difficult infestations a combination of residual barriers and baits may be used.

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Now this is some serious bug squashing!

 



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2 thumbs up 76!

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Bed Bugs and the frequent Traveler

 

In todays day and age, business travel is the "norm", for some its bed bugspecialized training, conferences and meetings. When we arrive at our destination, suffering from jet lag or coming in on a red eye, we are focused on what...SLEEP! The last thing on our mind is bed bugs, but should it be?

The truth of the matter is, bed bugs can surface at any hotel or motel, run down or top end. Bed bugs can be found not just on the bedding but have been found on headboards, decorative pillows and even popcorn celling texture.

So what can you do to protect yourself while traveling? this answer is easy and takes a matter of 10 minutes. First and foremost you will want to inspect your mattress for bed bugs by pulling back the sheets, blanket and comforter, looking carefully at the seams and tufts for bed bugs or bed bug evidences (black fecal spots).  If you discover any evidence you should report this to the management and request a new room.

So now i'm sure you are wondering if bed bugs can make their way back home with you, absolutely! I would recommend that you wash all clothing when returning home regardless if you wore them or not.

I hope this article prompts all to do an inspection when checking into a hotel or motel, make your stay less stressful and more pleasant...Inspect your bedding!

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