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Rodent Proofing for the Fall and Winter - Rodent Control

 

Clark Pest Control
www.clarkpest.com 

Rodent-control

When fall and winter arrive, the cold weather motivates us to find warmth indoors. But we’re not the only creatures who seek such comfort. Mice and rats prefer a toasty environment over the shivery outdoors, too – and if they can find a way into your toasty environment, they will. The problem, then, is how to keep these rodents from coming in and setting up housekeeping.

As with other pests, a lot of rodent pest control problems can be solved by employing two simple principles: exclusion and sanitation. The Clark rodent control approach is anchored in Integrated Pest Management, or IPM, a process that seeks to solve pest problems while minimizing risks to people and to the environment.

Let’s start with rodent exclusion, or keeping these animals out. A house mouse only needs a 3/8-inch opening – less than the circumference of a dime – to get in; a Norway rat or roof rat needs a 3/4-inch opening, which is less than the circumference of a quarter. So, to rodent-proof your home effectively, you’ll want to close off anything larger than a 1/4-inch opening.

We’ll start with doors, one of the most common points of entry. Gaps along the bottom edge, ones big enough to let rodents in, can be eliminated by installing brush strips, usually made from nylon or polypropylene bristles. Garage doors can be fitted with compression seals that perform the same function. Also, check window screens to make sure they are not torn or otherwise compromised, and make sure that basement windows, if you have them, don’t provide a way in.

Once all doors and windows are secured, you’ll want to examine the walls and foundations around your home for cracks and holes, which can be blocked temporarily with copper or steel wool wire mesh until more permanent repairs can be made.

Look for other potential entry points, too – specifically, holes where utility lines or pipes enter, which can be blocked off with wire mesh and caulking or plastic foam. Vents and ventilation openings will need to be covered by secure screens.

Rats are excellent climbers. If you have a chimney, it should be rain-capped with a spark arrestor, and think about other places high up where a rat could get in – roof defects, gaps between roof and structure, attic vents. Also, make sure you’ve trimmed any overhanging branches that might provide an easy route for rats to access your roof.

The other principle to bear in mind that should keep your living space rodent free is sanitation.  While rodent exclusion measures will help keep them out, good sanitation practices will eliminate many of the causes and conditions that help rodents to thrive.

Every pest, include rodents, needs food, water and harborage to survive. Outside, things like unsecured garbage cans, pet food left in the open, or overgrown patches of weeds, are like hanging out a sign that welcomes rats to your yard. Make sure your garbage is kept in cans or containers that can’t be accessed by rats, along with raccoons and opossums.

Keep any pet food in secure containers, too, and pick up pet dishes and empty the contents once your pets have finished feeding. Remember that if your yard is acting as a rat magnet, when a cold snap hits, you can bet those rats will try to find a way into your home’s more comfortable interior, should they be presented with the opportunity.

Inside, clutter is the enemy. Mice, in particular, will thrive in harborage provided by randomly scattered items. By cleaning up any areas in basements, garages or other rooms, if mice do find a way into your home, they won’t have as many places to set up housekeeping.

Solving rodent pest control problems isn’t rocket science. Putting the common-sense ideas we’ve outlined into practice in your home will help you make it through the winter months without unwanted guests.

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Sniffer dogs deployed to combat rat plague in Queensland

 

Rats

ox terriers Mya and Pepper, pictured with handlers Charlie Cinconze and Nicholas Snabaitis, are part of the rat detection squad in Goodna. Picture: Annette Dew

By Anna Chisholm

RATS chewing through phone cables are causing chaos in abandoned flood-hit homes at Goodna, southwest of Brisbane, and as far as Birdsville in west Queensland.

Diamantina Mayor Robbie Dare said the rodents wreaked havoc, chewing cables and causing major communication problems.

"Telstra have technicians out there replacing the cables it's affected internet, all communications and tourism," he said.

"Not many tourists carry cash any more they go to pay with a card and the terminals don't work because communications are down."

Cr Dare said the problem is too big for any local government to bait.

"We catch about 60 a night at the back of the roadhouse at Bedourie; it's been going on since before Christmas and it doesn't seem like it will let up," he said.

"They're breeding like wildfire and spreading further out north and further east."


Read more: http://www.news.com.au/national/big-rat-problem-has-gone-to-the-dogs/story-e6frfkvr-1226076734126#ixzz1PYLiBrg8

 

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California Rats - Rats Gone Wild: Rodents Invade SoCal Homes

 

As temperatures rise, experts say more and more residents are discovering rat infestations in their homes.


Watch Lu Parker's Report
Source: KTLA.com

LOS ANGELES -- As the temperatures start to rise, so too do unwanted pests in and around your house. Residents of a number of Los Angeles neighborhoods are reporting rat infestations in their homes.

With the recent discovery of mice infected with hantavirus in Devore and Coyote Canyon near Fontana in San Bernardino County, officials are urging residents to avoid contact with any kind of rodent and to take precautions to reduce rodent populations.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends residents eliminate any available food sources by storing food and trash in rodent-proof containers, and frequently cleaning the containers with soap and water. Pet food and birdseed are favorite snacks of rodents. Pet food should not be left out, but removed after the pet has eaten. If you have rats or mice, you may want to remove any birdfeeders around your home as well.

Residents are also advised to trap any mice or rats they see, rather than using poison which can lead to unwanted odors and hidden carcasses. Be sure to seal up all entry holes and plug any gaps inside as well as outside your home with steel wool, metal lath or caulk.

Keep in mind that rodents can enter your home through holes as small as a quarter and can breed seven times a year. They typically invade cool spots in search of water. They can often be found in crawl spaces underneath homes and in attics, but can eventually migrate into other parts of your home with enough time and opportunity.

Click here to read the entire article

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Rodent Control - Hantavirus poses health risk

 

Source: Inland News Today

FONTANA – Hantavirus has reappeared, but so far no humans have been infected. 

Local health officials confirm that blood samples from mice in the areas of Coyote Canyon in Fontana and the unincorporated area of Devore were positive for Hantavirus. 

Hantavirus is transmitted by infected rodents through their urine, droppings or saliva. Peoplerodent become infected after inhaling, ingesting, and/or handling rodent excrements or nesting materials. 

There is no health emergency, but people are being forewarned. 

· Avoid contact with rodents. Do not pick up or handle rodents of any kind. 

· Eliminate harborage, water sources, and food sources for mice and rats around the home. (INT)  

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Rodent Control - Rats invade Florida homes in search of warmth

 

Source: wtsp.com

Clearwater, FL-- Humans aren't the only ones in Florida getting chilly in this week's unusually cold temperatures. Local pest control companies say they've seen a jump in calls from people complaining about rats and other rodents seeking warmth in their homes.

It seems the disease spreading rodents are not only in search of food, but now are also trying to escape the cold temperatures, squeezing into people's houses through openings as small as a quarter.

"They're just like humans. They don't want to be cold," said Dave Bernstein, branch manager of Orkin Pest Control's Tampa branch office.

Clearwater resident Chaep'n Hurst is among the Bay area residents who unexpectedly found an unwanted visitor in her home.

"I heard a noise behind the couch that freaked me out, then I heard a whisk," said Hurst after spotting an estimated 8 inch long rat running through her kitchen.

"That kind of rat should be in New York. It shouldn't be in Florida, and it certainly shouldn't be in my apartment with my kids."

Management at Hurst's Clearwater apartment complex placed traps throughout her home, but as temperatures dropped this week even more rats showed up. She says at least three other neighbors have now complained of similar problems.

The news doesn't surprise local pest control technicians.


 Click here to read the entire article

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Construction sends rats back to Brighton Beach streets

 

The rats are back.

Herds of rodents have returned to a pest-plagued corner of Brighton Beach a year after the city ended a nearby infestation.

"It's like a horror movie out here," said Mark Kuchinsky, a building owner who counted 30 on his Brighton 7th St. block one night last week. "The rats make my skin crawl."

Last January, a Daily News article exposed a massive rat infestation near Shore Parkway. City Health Department officials baited the area and killed the rats, ending the infestation - or so everyone thought.

Now the rats have returned, and residents say the situation is even worse than before.

The pests began to reappear in February when a construction project at the Eighth Street Bridge disturbed a huge underground rat's nest beneath the Belt Parkway crossing.

Since then, rats the size of small cats have taken over nearby streets after nightfall, frightening residents and destroying property.

Kuchinsky, 50, said rodents ate holes in his garbage cans and destroyed his garden. He's put out $250 worth of poison and traps, and removed 15 dead rats - some up to 18 inches long - from his property.

Sam Gomon, who also lives on Brighton 7th St., said the rats chewed through wires under the hood of his car when it was parked on his street.

Gomon, 63, had the wires repaired for $50, and his mechanic also removed a dead rat stuck to his engine.

When he starts the car at night, dozens of rodents scurry before his headlights.

"There're so many of them, as far as I can see," he said. "I can't take it anymore."

Some in the neighborhood have hired costly professionals to keep away the pests.

Click here to read the entire article

 

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Rat Control - Are We Headed For A Ratdemic?

 

Source: http://gothamist.com

ratdemic 

Last month word got out that budget cuts would lead to more rodents in our fair city, with the Department of Health cutting pest control aides on payroll from 84 to 57. Now the Daily News reports-screeching atop a dining room table, we imagine-"we'll be overrun by rats!"

The Union representing pest control workers in the city told them, "A lot of people are going to be seeing a lot of rats. It's going to take much longer to get vacant city lots cleaned up and to get rats exterminated. It's going to be a disaster. Rats are all over New York City, and we're just trying to contain it. We're going to have chaos in the city."

Sounds like we're in for a RATDEMIC over here. Or not? A spokeswoman at the Health Department told us that even though they're severely cutting down on staff, "the agency will restructure the Pest Control Lot Cleaning Program while maintaining capacity to respond to situations needing immediate attention. Rat conditions vary over time and there are likely many lots that need cleaning but do not necessarily have an ongoing significant rat problem. Reducing the number of lot cleaning teams will enable the program to more effectively target properties contributing to neighborhood rat infestation." The less-is-more argument... unexpected! They also assured us: "This will not result in more rats," which is the same as saying, "this will not result in less rats."

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Reduced trash pick-ups could mean rodent trouble for Flint MI.

 

Reduced Flint trash pick-up begins Monday; residents worry about onset of rodents

By Kristin Longley | Flint Journal

FLINT, Michigan - His formal name is Rattus norvegicus, but here in Flint we know him intimately as the rat.

The greasy, gnawing rodent feeds at night, burrows beneath homes and garages and eats everything no matter how disgusting.

But its delicacy of choice? Fresh household trash.

The preferred diet of the rat - and other pesky vermin - has some residents worried that a city decision to collect trash every other week will cause an explosion of the local rodent population.

Rats are attracted to exposed garbage, which could become a serious health hazard if people store trash near their homes, said Genesee County Health Officer Mark Valacak.

Rats can carry several communicable diseases, can fit through an opening a half of an inch wide and are known to bite, he said.

"Just wait for the mice and things to come," said Flint resident Charlie Luster, 68. "People aren't going to want (trash) in their home, and they'll put it out on the side of the road."

Beginning Monday, residential trash pickup will be reduced to every other week, meaning household waste in most cases will be sitting around for an extra week before crews are able to collect it - and it will be up to residents to make sure it's properly stored.

Garbage needs to be kept in secure, covered containers - preferably ones strong enough to withstand tiny, sharp teeth, said Valacak.

Storing trash properly also will cut down on odors and deterioration of wet garbage, he said.

"I'm personally going to have to buy two more trash cans with secure lids," Flint Mayor Dayne Walling said. "We're going to have to do some new things in new ways."

Walling said the trash cuts will save the city about $20,000 a week and more than $1 million in the first full year. The city is trying to trim a projected $8 million deficit.

News reports show cash-strapped cities across the nation are considering similar cuts or privatization of trash collection to save money.

Still, residents can't help but picture a stinky summer with bags of trash rotting in the sun or fear for an increase in illegal dumping on Flint's hundreds of vacant lots...

Click here to read the entire article

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Reduced trash pick-ups could mean rodent trouble for Flint MI.

 

Reduced Flint trash pick-up begins Monday; residents worry about onset of rodents

By Kristin Longley | Flint Journal

FLINT, Michigan - His formal name is Rattus norvegicus, but here in Flint we know him intimately as the rat.

The greasy, gnawing rodent feeds at night, burrows beneath homes and garages and eats everything no matter how disgusting.

But its delicacy of choice? Fresh household trash.

The preferred diet of the rat - and other pesky vermin - has some residents worried that a city decision to collect trash every other week will cause an explosion of the local rodent population.

Rats are attracted to exposed garbage, which could become a serious health hazard if people store trash near their homes, said Genesee County Health Officer Mark Valacak.

Rats can carry several communicable diseases, can fit through an opening a half of an inch wide and are known to bite, he said.

"Just wait for the mice and things to come," said Flint resident Charlie Luster, 68. "People aren't going to want (trash) in their home, and they'll put it out on the side of the road."

Beginning Monday, residential trash pickup will be reduced to every other week, meaning household waste in most cases will be sitting around for an extra week before crews are able to collect it - and it will be up to residents to make sure it's properly stored.

Garbage needs to be kept in secure, covered containers - preferably ones strong enough to withstand tiny, sharp teeth, said Valacak.

Storing trash properly also will cut down on odors and deterioration of wet garbage, he said.

"I'm personally going to have to buy two more trash cans with secure lids," Flint Mayor Dayne Walling said. "We're going to have to do some new things in new ways."

Walling said the trash cuts will save the city about $20,000 a week and more than $1 million in the first full year. The city is trying to trim a projected $8 million deficit.

News reports show cash-strapped cities across the nation are considering similar cuts or privatization of trash collection to save money.

Still, residents can't help but picture a stinky summer with bags of trash rotting in the sun or fear for an increase in illegal dumping on Flint's hundreds of vacant lots...

Click here to read the entire article

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Rat Control - Bethesda school dealing with rats

 

By: Bill Myers
Examiner Staff Writer
March 9, 2010

Students in a Bethesda elementary school are getting a hands-on lesson in pest control as their teachers and principals find themselves fighting off a rat infestation.

In an e-mail to parents and staff, Burning Tree Elementary School Rat Controlofficials announced that they had found a rat's nest on campus and "two or Three [sic] dead rats."

Montgomery County Public Schools spokesman Dana Tofig blamed February's blizzard for the school's new tenants.

"The snow, just like with a house, makes schools attractive places to hide," he said. "It doesn't appear to be widespread."

School officials have laid 42 traps and caught at least two rats, principal Nancy Erdrich said in a statement, which was reported by The Washington Post.

"Your children have not been in any danger," Erdrich was quoted as saying. "Our building services staff has been working hard to keep the building clean and they are sanitizing affected areas."

Efforts to reach the school's parents association on Monday were unsuccessful. Rats are common, though unwelcome, visitors to schools - where there's lots of places to hide and plenty of crumbs to munch.

An elementary school in Saugus, Mass., was shut down twice in late January and early February because of rats in the cafeteria and in a kindergarten vent.

The problem is international in scope: A school in County Carlow, Ireland, was shuttered in February because of a rat infestation; a school in Wales was closed last summer after rats took over the school's cafeteria.

In late February, a school district in Edinburgh, Scotland, reported that school officials had summoned exterminators 625 times in a year to deal with infestations of ants, mice, rats and even squirrels.

Rats steal food, gnaw on electric cables and wires, tear up the inside of walls and carry more than 70 diseases, from leptospirosis, a kidney and liver disease, to the bubonic plague.



Read more at the Washington Examiner: http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/local/Bethesda-school-dealing-with-rats-86998372.html#ixzz0hoYu6vII
 



 

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