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NPMA Legislative Day in Washington - Clark Pest Control

 

 

Clark Pest Control's Nicole Keefe and Darren Van Steenwyk Attend the NPMA Legislative Day in Washington

If you weren’t born looking like the little mustachioed guy in the top hat from the Monopoly game, perhaps the best way to get a sit-down audience with your representative or senator in Congress, along with their attention, is to go as part of a group focused on making change happen. Which is why every spring, the National Pest Management Association hosts an annual NPMA Legislative Day in Washington. This year’s three-day session took place March 17-19. Clark Pest Control participated in the event by sending two executives, Technical Director Darren Van Steenwyk and Marketing Director Nicole Keefe.

A number of at-large events took place – hosted luncheons and presentations with legislators and industry people, along with various meetings and breakout sessions. However, the event was structured so that participants could set up appointments on one of the days to meet with senators or representatives from their home states. Seven of the nine California representatives who participated in the event hail from districts that Clark Pest Control services. Van Steenwyk and Keefe met with some of them, or their staffers, to talk about issues pertinent to business in general and pest management in particular.

“The legislators were receptive to us – a lot more than in the past,” Van Steenwyk says.

nicole darren clark pestKeefe agrees with Van Steenwyk, in that the event was a success. “I don’t know if attitudes are changing,” she says, “but no matter which side of the fence we were talking to, they were receptive, they were engaged, they were listening, they seemed like they knew what we were talking about, and I haven’t had that experience the last couple of years.”

The game plan was to focus on three issues of importance to Californians, and California pest control operators (PCOs), that the NPMA had identified.
 

One issue has to do with how information is passed on to consumers; the language used in consumer-affairs laws in some states, California included, mandates that pesticide disclosure notices, service records and certain other pieces of information must be delivered to every consumer via hard copy. Many companies and customers are working hard to manage resources better and reduce waste, and would prefer to receive that information as, say, a PDF sent via e-mail instead. If the requirement was changed, companies like Clark Pest Control – which has embraced S.M.A.R.T. (Sustainable Methods and Responsible Treatments) business practices to better serve its customers and meet their needs – could cut back on paper use by notifying customers electronically.

“That’s an example of where consumer attitudes are far ahead of our industry’s ability to meet consumer attitudes,” Keefe says. “The other thing we have to do is hold on to records, like termite inspections, for three years. It becomes quite cumbersome and expensive for a company when you have to find space to hold all of that, rather than sticking it on a server that could occupy one tidy little spot.” Instead of pushing to get legislation passed state by state, Keefe says the NPMA is advocating an amendment to the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act, or FIFRA, which would supersede current state laws.

Another issue arises from the way a 1987 law that authorizes the Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services program to manage nuisance birds and mammals in non-agricultural settings has been interpreted in the years since. While the law may have been written to give government employees the authority to manage bird problems at airports and deal with other wildlife-related issues, its broadly scoped language allows government agencies to compete with private-sector businesses, such as pest control companies, to control rats, mice and other vertebrate pests. The bipartisan Pest Elimination Services Transparency & Terminology (PESTT) Act (H.R. 730) defines the term “urban rodent control,” and directs the Government Accountability Office (GAO) to write a report that not only identifies actions that the Wildlife Services program performs that could be handled by the private sector, but makes recommendations on how to avoid competition in the future.

“What has happened, and we understand it’s through budget cuts, is that the Wildlife Services program has been supplementing its budget by actually doing pest control work that directly competes with us in the private sector,” Keefe says. “This last year, they did around $71 million of pest control work that could have been done by the private sector. That wasn’t the intention when it was formed.”

The third issue centers around the use of the gas sulfuryl fluoride, or SF, a broad-spectrumnicole keefe clark pest fumigant that had been championed by the EPA as a replacement for methyl bromide, which was phased out globally after being identified as an ozone-depleting chemical in the 1990s. In January 2011, the EPA issued a proposed order to revoke the use of SF to treat food items – various bulk commodities such as rice, dried fruit, cocoa, peanuts, walnuts and other items – and as a fumigant in grain mills and food-processing facilities, largely to avoid lawsuits from anti-fluoridation groups, even though, according to the EPA, the fluoride present in SF fumigations represents a tiny fraction of fluoride exposure to the public. What the EPA then did was it lumped naturally occurring fluoride in drinking water systems, a non-pesticide, in with SF fumigants when evaluating risk assessment for SF per Sec. 408 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA); the EPA already regulates drinking-water fluoride with the Safe Drinking Water Act. The problem arises when drinking-water fluoride, especially in places where it occurs naturally in excess, maxes out the “risk cup” for the aggregate exposure assessment for SF, which removes the fumigant from consideration for use. A legislative fix would remove drinking-water fluoride from the “risk cup” for sulfuryl fluoride.

“That’s actually a really scary development that could cost a lot of jobs in our area,” Keefe says, “when you think of all the almonds, all the rice – those are all commodities that are treated with sulfuryl fluoride, because [the EPA] took away methyl bromide. Without sulfuryl fluoride, there’s nothing; all that industry, that processing, would go overseas.”

 

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Bed bugs buggin ya?

 

Bugs Without Borders: Bed Bugs Spreading Out, Digging In

The little pests travel undetected and become very attached to their new homes

Truman Lewis
consumeraffairs.com

What pest is popping up just about everywhere these days? Presidential bed bugscandidates, you say? Perhaps, but we were actually thinking of bed bugs. A new survey finds that the pesky devils are steadily taking over new territory.

The study, conducted by the National Pest Management Association and the University of Kentucky, surveyed U.S. pest management professionals and found that 99 percent of respondents encountered bed bug infestations in the past year. More than eight of out ten said  that bed bug infestations are increasing across the country.

This represents a sharp increase in prevalence as only 11 percent of respondents reported receiving bed bug calls more than 10 years ago.

One of the most significant findings is that bed bug encounters have become much more common in public places than the previous year, in some instances increasing by 10, 20 or nearly 30 percent.

“The increase in bed bug encounters is likely due to a combination of factors, but one thing is clear — this pest shows no signs of retreating,” noted Missy Henriksen, vice president of public affairs for NPMA. “Of most concern are the places where pest professionals are encountering bed bugs, such as schools, hospitals, and hotels/motels.”

Public vigilance is vital to controlling the spread, she said.

“Increased public awareness, education and vigilance are key in detecting and preventing bed bug infestations as these pests tend to travel undetected from place to place, breed quickly and remain one of the most challenging to treat,” added Henriksen.

Read the article in its entirity at http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news04/2011/09/bugs-without-borders-bed-bugs-spreading-out-digging-in.html

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Day 2 Bed bug tour - continued - Jim Fredericks

 

Jim Fredericks is now taking the stage

(NPMA bed bug task force)

Understanding Bed Bug Treatment and Inspection Methods

Jim is speaking about his first bed bug experience...

jim fredricks npma

Bed bugs in America

  • 95% PMP's reported seeing or dealing with Bed Bugs last year
  • 20% report BB infestations greater than 10 years
  • 76% PMP's say its the most difficult pest to treat

Best management practices

  • integrated methods- non-chemical, traditional options and monitoring devices
  • community wide approach - discourage disposal of mattress,inspections,train and educate
  • consumer protection-Identify active infestations, communicate fees,details of service,expectations
  • education- training all employees,tech's,salespeople involved in the bed bug work, educate,communicate

Visit the link below to learn more best practices:

www.bedbugbmps.org

 

Methods of Detection Being Used

  • Canine scent detection
  • Visual inspections
  • Monitoring Devices - Active, heat, carbon dioxide, passive monitors 
  • Mattress & Box spring encasements
  • Vacuums
  • Traditional Insecticides
  • Steam
  • Heat
  • Freezing
  • Fumigation

Jim Fredericks continues...

Bed bugs "the BIG picture"

based on surveys submitted in November of 2010

Consumer attitudes about bed bugs

  • Creepy
  • dirty
  • nasty
  • itchy
  • gross
  • bites

Have you heard anything about bed bugs?

  • 80% yes
  • 20% no

How did you hear about bed bugs?

  • TV 80%
  • Newspapers 35%
  • Online 25%
  • friends and family 17%
  • radio 10%
  • ads/flyers 3%
  • Apartment managers 1%

T or F - Bed Bugs transmit diease to and from humans

  • 45% yes
  • 32% not sure

The Answer is FALSE

Bed Bugs are more common among lower incomes? 

FALSE

T or F Bed Bugs are attracted to dirty homes 

FALSE

Are Bed bugs on the rise?

were on an upward trend globally!

Where are they finding Bed Bugs?

  • homes 
  • apartments 
  • public transportation 
  • hospitals 
  • laundry rooms 
  • movie theaters 
  • churches 
  • doctors offices

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

The Pest Management Pledge To The People Of Haiti

 

Source: The Huffington Post
Source URL: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/rob-lederer/the-pest-management-pledg_b_609330.html 

The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) is used to responding to overwhelming pest problems and significant outbreaks in the aftermath of disasters, as it has with Hurricane Katrina and September 11th. However, as NPMA's 14-member delegation prepared for its trip to Haiti, the group wondered what the industry could possibly do to help. The problems seemed "too big." The devastation appeared "too large" and the conditions just seemed "too deplorable" to know how to help or where to even begin.

All of this however, was before the NPMA delegation met the people of Haiti and experienced their tremendous resolve. As they rebuild their land and their lives, we will assist them in their recovery by carrying out the Pest Management Pledge to protect the public health in Haiti.

Our delegation traveled to Haiti in May at the request of the Haitian Minister of Environment to assess the severe pest infestations that are threatening the country's already compromised public health problems. We are bug people - we are used to dealing with the "icky" and the "gross". It's what we are trained to do. However, no amount of training or prior experiences in Third World countries prepared us for the extraordinary pest conditions we saw in Haiti, especially in the medical facilities.

During our visit we saw mosquitoes buzzing around operating rooms. We witnessed nurses shooing rodents from recovery rooms and children's wards like they were stray cats that had wandered and needed a clap of the hands to redirect them outdoors. Cockroaches scampered across beds and floors, attracted by the offerings of human body parts and waste that sat openly in the hallways. We heard concerns from doctors who feared complications developing in patients who had flies landing on their open wounds during surgery. Roaches fed upon corpses, having no respect for dignity. We saw large openings from the outdoors right into what should have been sterile medical rooms.

The list of diseases carried by the pests and the health problems they cause is extensive. Dengue fever, malaria, E.coli, salmonella, and asthma are just a few that can make a healthy person sick - the complications and risks are obviously worse for those whose immune systems are already weak.

"Don't these highly-qualified medical practitioners realize the huge complications that could come from allowing these pests to come into contact with patients," we wondered? "Why don't they do something," we kept asking ourselves. The answers became obvious - they have no other choice. They are trying to save lives as best they can in their current situation and don't have the information, resources or time to treat or prevent pest infestations that threaten their patients.

From this realization, the Pest Management Pledge was born. The NPMA, through its members' charitable donations, is pledging resources, materials and people and is committed to spending the next year providing proper pest management structure to Haitian hospitals. We want to ensure that those who come in for medical assistance don't leave in worse shape due to a pest-transmitted disease picked up during their stay.

In addition to providing the resources needed to combat their enormous pest problems, the pest management industry is going to hire, train, guide and mentor Haitian employees to treat the hospitals. These hired personnel will be compensated through funds raised for the Pest Management Pledge and will inject a much-needed revenue stream into the Haitian economy. Our job training will strengthen Haiti's pest management industry so that when we turn to help those in another area, we will have left a skilled and knowledgeable workforce, prepared with the tools to prevent escalating problems in the future. We will also develop a robust and appropriate public service campaign so that Haiti civilians will understand more about the simple actions they can take in their day-to-day lives to minimize the likelihood of infestations.

We have the resources to help the Haitian people so that hospitals become a shelter for the ill instead of a haven for disease-carrying pests. We have the resources to help train Haitian pest control companies and workers so that they can continue to treat this problem as the country continues its long road to recovery. And we have the resources to deal with these problems now, before the rainy season breeds more pests and makes the current conditions worse. The risk to public health is grave and it is our duty to decrease that risk as much as possible. Haiti needs help on so many fronts and we are proud that we can help with this one. For more information about the Pest Management Pledge, please visit http://www.npmapestworld.com/haiti.htm

Rob Lederer is the Executive Vice President of the National Pest Management Association (NPMA). The NPMA, is a non-profit organization with more than 7,000 members, was established in 1933 to support the pest management industry's commitment to the protection of public health, food and property.

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

NPMA to Initiate the Pest Management Pledge – Protecting Public Health in Haiti

 
5/19/2010

The NPMA delegation has initiated a strategic plan to work with the Haitian government, hospital administrators and local pest control companies to address medical facilities on a case-by-case basis and with specifically tailored pest management plans.

 

FAIRFAX, Va. - A 14-member delegation from the National Pest Management Association (NPMA) returned  last week from a fact-finding mission in Haiti where the group surveyed deteriorating pest conditions in hospitals in Port-au-Prince as a result of the January 2010 earthquake. The conditions within these facilities, according to the delegation, are deplorable as medical facilities and tent cities are overrun with fly, cockroach and rodent infestations, which leave patients at risk for contracting various pest-borne illnesses, such as E-Coli and Salmonella. The physical devastation to the country - and the inability to handle the massive amounts of debris caused by the earthquake - has created the ultimate breeding ground for pests. Such conditions will likely be exacerbated by the arrival of Haiti's yearly hurricane season in June and cause increased possibilities for the spread of pest-borne illnesses within much of the still displaced population. 

In response to the clear need for pest control services in Haiti, NPMA is preparing to launch a new industry-wide support program entitled, The Pest Management Pledge - Protecting Public Health in Haiti. 

"The pest issues facing Haiti are grave, especially in hospitals," said Rob Lederer, executive vice president of NPMA.  "In visiting hospitals that are meant to be safe havens for the ill and seeing the severe pest problems that threaten the work of doctors and nurses in Haiti, it became clear to our delegation that this was the first, necessary area in which to provide our expertise and resources. NPMA has always answered the call in the wake of natural disasters and after seeing the immediate need in Haiti, I am fully confident that our members will take this pledge and help us as we begin to implement a formal plan of action. " 

The NPMA delegation has initiated a strategic plan to work with the Haitian government, hospital administrators and local pest control companies to address medical facilities on a case-by-case basis and with specifically tailored pest management plans. NPMA will use its resources to help minimize pest entry points, purchase products designed to prevent pest infestations and most importantly, to train Haitian pest professionals so that they can properly perform pest control operations in an ongoing manner.

 "It is imperative that we work efficiently and effectively to assist the Haitian people now, but also provide them with vital long-term pest management training that will help them in rebuilding their country," said Lederer.  "Our industry has already shown tremendous leadership and support in assisting Haiti and we will continue to rely upon the valuable input and demonstrated commitment of our members as we work to create healthier hospital environments through The Pest Management Pledge.  The generosity of our membership - in funding, time and talent - is necessary to the success of this initiative and I have every confidence that our membership will step up to meet the public health and property challenges currently facing Haiti." 

NPMA has begun to look toward planning a future trip to Haiti where volunteers will not only provide training and materials to the Haitian pest control companies but also, will work with the appropriate parties to ensure the field work meets the level of professional standards.  If interested in learning more on the fact-finding mission in Haiti, visit NPMA's blog: http://npmablog.wordpress.com/. To learn how to be of professional assistance or to donate funds to this initiative, please visit http://www.npmapestworld.org/Haiti.htm

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

NPMA Prepares to Launch Crucial Pest Control Initiative in Haitian Hospitals

 

National Pest Management Association Prepares to Launch Crucial Pest Control Initiative in Haitian Hospitals

© Business Wire 2010
2010-05-18 15:50:14 -

A delegation from the National Pest Management Association (NPMA) has returned from a fact-finding mission in Haiti where the group surveyed pest conditions in hospitals in Port-au-Prince resulting from the January 2010 earthquake. The conditions within these facilities are deplorable as medical facilities are overrun with fly, cockroach, mosquito and rodent infestations - all of which can transmit serious diseases, such as E-Coli and Salmonella from flies and cockroaches, malaria and dengue fever from mosquitoes or cause respiratory distress due to the presence of rodent droppings.

"The pest issues facing Haiti are grave, especially in hospitals," said Rob Lederer, executive vice president of NPMA. "In visiting hospitals that are meant to be safe havens for the ill and seeing the severe pest problems that threaten the work of doctors and nurses in Haiti, it became clear that this was the first, necessary area in which to provide our expertise and resources."


The NPMA delegation has initiated a strategic plan to work with the Haitian government, hospital administrators and local pest control companies to address medical facilities with tailored treatment plans.

NPMA will use its resources to help minimize pest entry points, purchase products for preventing pest infestations and to train Haitian pest professionals so they can properly perform pest control operations in an ongoing manner.

"The physical devastation to the country has created a terrific breeding ground for pests and these conditions will be aggravated by the arrival of the hurricane season in Haiti in June," said Lederer. "It is imperative that we work efficiently to implement an immediate plan of action that will assist the Haitian people now, but also provide them with vital long-term pest management training that will help them in rebuilding their country."

For more information on the fact-finding mission in Haiti, visit NPMA's blog: npmablog.wordpress.com .
For more information on the National Pest Management Association or for details about pest issues, visit www.pestworld.org :  .

The NPMA, a non-profit organization with more than 7,000 members, was established in 1933 to support the pest management industry's commitment to the protection of public health, food and property.




The National Pest Management AssociationMissy Henriksen,

703-352-6762 mhenriksen@pestworld.org : mailto:mhenriksen@pestworld.org



Vault Communications, Inc.Meg Kane, 610-455-2746 mkane@vaultcommunications.com : mailto:mkane@vaultcommunications.com


Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Haiti Pest Control update - day 1

 

Npma executive vice president bestows gifts to our host pest management professional Terry Boucare. Terry has updated us on the scope of our agenda.

NPMA in Haiti

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

CLARK PEST CONTROL EXECUTIVE ASKED TO AID HAITI

 

Clark Pest Control EXECUTIVE ASKED TO AID HAITI GOVERNMENT WITH POST-EARTHQUAKE PEST ISSUES

 

Terry Clark Traveling to Haiti with National Pest Management Association to

Assess & Treat the Country's Pest Management Needs

 

LODI, Calif. (April 28, 2010) - We are all aware of the destruction caused by the major earthquake that hit Port au Prince, Haiti on January 12th.  While the country is still dealing with widespread damage to its infrastructure and health and safety issues for its people, there are other major concerns that are not often discussed - like bugs. 

The Haitian government recently called upon the National Pest Management Association (NPMA) and a select group of its delegates to assist the country in dealing with pest and rodent control. Terry Clark, vice president of Clark Pest Control in Lodi, Calif., was asked to participate in this effort because of his previous work with the NPMA Board of Directors.  Terry is known to be a ‘creative thinker' and they need this type of out-of-the-box thinking to build action plans and guide the implementation of the pest management solutions in the Haiti disaster area.  

"I am thrilled at the opportunity help with this relief effort in Haiti," said Terry Clark, vice president, Clark Pest Control.  "The personal risks are there but it is important that we share the resources and technology we have with a community that truly needs our help because I know we can go over there and make a real difference."

The NPMA team is focusing on three major pest problems in the tent cities and the hospitals.  Port-au-Prince and its surrounding areas are overrun with pests including flies, rodents and cockroaches, and it is causing major health and safety concerns for the Haitian people. Yet the pest control plans must take many issues into consideration - including the heat and humidity, especially as we are nearing the onset of hurricane season.

Some of the health risks posed by the pests include the transmission of pathogens and bacteria such as E-coli and Salmonella that can result in illness and disease, increased potential for asthma attacks and respiratory distress due to cockroach and rodent allergens and food contamination.  In addition, the flies are so bad in the latrines that people are choosing not to use them and leaving their personal waste outside instead.

 "This will by far be the largest rodent control job I have personally worked on," said Terry Clark. "And I have seen infestations exceeding 10,000 rats at one property."

While Terry is in Haiti participating in the Haitian Relief effort, Clark Pest Control will be tracking his work and experience through an online blog at http://blog.clarkpest.com.

The primary mission of this first delegation leaving May 5th is to assess current pest issues and potential infestation risk factors.  The group of NPMA delegates will then determine the number of follow-up visits needed to implement control measures and monitor the results moving forward.

"The Haitian people are facing a long and hard recovery and it is important that we provide continued support that will see them through," added Clark.

Note:
Throughout Terry's visit, Terry Clark will be in close contact so be prepared for updates on the work he will be doing.

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Wet Winter Weather Will Have an Impact on Pests This Season

 
Press Release Source: National Pest Management Association (NPMA) On Tuesday March 9, 2010, 12:26 pm EST

FAIRFAX, Va.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--As one of the stormiest winters in history ends, the National Pest Management Association (NPMA) reminds homeowners that increased moisture from excessive rain and melting snow can create havens for pests in and around homes. These wet conditions encourage pest reproduction and growth.

Nearly 900 cities across the U.S. saw record snowfall and precipitation, while some states experienced the snowiest winter in decades, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

"As many areas of the country emerge from a snowy and wet winter, homeowners should expect to see an increase in pest pressure this spring and summer," said Missy Henriksen, vice president of public affairs for the NPMA. "Common pests including rodents, ants and cockroaches flourish in these conditions."

"Homeowners should deal with a pest problem immediately as household pests can pose health risks to homeowners and their families such as allergic reactions, E.coli and salmonella contaminations, increased asthma symptoms and other health problems," advised Henriksen.

Typically, infestations occur when pests enter the house through small access areas on the home's exterior. Homeowners should perform seasonal home checks using the following tips provided by the NPMA:

  • Repair fascia, soffits and rotted roof shingles.
  • Seal cracks and holes including entry points for utilities and pipes.
  • Replace weather-stripping and repair loose mortar around basement foundation and windows.
  • Trim tree branches and shrubbery and keep away from the house.
  • Screen windows and doors.
  • Keep basements, attics and crawl spaces well ventilated and dry.
  • Store garbage in sealed containers and dispose of it regularly.
  • Call a qualified pest professional for additional advice and treatment if necessary.

"Planning for and defending against pests with the help of a licensed pest professional should be part of every homeowner's spring cleaning plan," Henriksen advised.

For more information on preventing pests or to find a pest professional in your area, please visit: www.pestworld.org.

The NPMA, a non-profit organization with more than 7,000 members, was established in 1933 to support the pest management industry's commitment to the protection of public health, food and property.

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.

Clark Pest - Clark is Awarded Green Certification in Sacramento

 
Source: Sacramento Business Journal  

Green bugs

Clark Pest Control has become the first company in the Sacramento area to receive a "green" certification by the National Pest Management Association.

The QualityPro Green certification requires companies to adopt an integrated pest management program. First they have to inspect a site and try non-chemical measures, such as trimming bushes that harbor rodents or sealing cracks that let in moisture and ants. If that doesn't work, they can introduce low-toxicity pesticides. Conventional pesticides become a last resort, and they try to use as little as possible.

"At this point the QualityPro Green certification is geared to individual sites," said Darren Van Steenwyk, Clark's technical director. "We're looking to implement this inspection-based service on a companywide scale."

Pest-control firms typically use a handful of products regularly. Clark is looking at alternatives. "We're looking at going away from synthetic pyrethroids and moving towards a botanical product," Steenwyk said. Among the candidates: oils of clove, eucalyptus and thyme.

Pyrethroid exposure can make people's skin itch or burn, and large amounts (way more than a pest-controller would spray around your home) can cause convulsions or knock people out for a few days.

But even the harmless-sounding botanical extracts can have some drawbacks.

"Sometimes the smell may be a little overpowering," Van Steenwyk said. "The technology is definitely improving. But in certain circumstances they work, and in certain circumstances they don't work."

http://sacramento.bizjournals.com/sacramento/stories/2008/11/10/story16.html
 clamb@bizjournals.com | 916-558-7866

Visit the Clark Pest Blog or visit ClarkPest.com to learn more.
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